Urban Health

Interior Health launches website targeting people who use drugs alone

If you or someone you know is using illicit drugs alone, Interior Health wants to know what it can do to help save your life.

Report Urges More Government Action to Prevent Overdoses

The British Columbia government can do a lot more to reduce the number of illicit drug overdose deaths in the province, a special panel report released Thursday found.

Coroners Service says B.C. must "support safer use" as the opioid epidemic kills another 100 people in February (Crosstown Clinic)

There might be no agency in British Columbia that understands the severity of B.C.’s overdose epidemic better than the province’s coroners service. Over the last five years, more than 3,800 bodies have passed through its offices in cases where the cause of death was subsequently identified as an illicit-drug overdose.

Researchers look at cannabis and prescription heroin to tackle opioid crisis (SALOME)

As the opioid crisis rages on across North America, a number of recent studies are pointing to cannabis and prescription heroin as viable options in curbing the consumption of lethal street opiates, reducing long-term medical and policing costs and extending the lives of users.

Nurse practitioners to play critical role saving lives in overdose crisis (BCCSU)

People living with opioid-use disorder now have more options to access life-saving medication that will help support them on their pathway to treatment and recovery.

B.C. allows nurses to prescribe opioid substitutes, lowering barriers to treatment and clean alternative to street drugs (BCCSU)

A large group of B.C. nurses can now prescribe a range of opioid substitutes that are used to treat addictions to drugs like heroin and fentanyl.

Barriers remain for accessing pharmaceutical-grade heroin (Crosstown Clinic)

Inside the Vancouver Network of Drug Users' overdose prevention site, Ryan Kingston injects heroin as a volunteer watches through a window to make sure nothing goes wrong. 

Injectable hydromorphone for individuals with severe opioid use disorder could save lives and money

Injectable hydromorphone treatment for severe opioid use disorder may reduce mortality and save costs to society compared to providing methadone alone. The findings come from an economic analysis of the groundbreaking SALOME trial, published this week in Addiction (link will be made available after the study is released.)

As feds ease access to prescription heroin, B.C. could see relief: doctor (Crosstown Clinic)

A doctor working the front lines at Canada’s only clinic to offer prescription heroin says Ottawa’s recent move to make access to safe opioids easier could very-well help curb the death toll in the B.C.

B.C. doctors welcome Ottawa's move to make it easier to prescribe heroin and methadone (Dr. Scott MacDonald)

As British Columbia grapples with the opioid overdose crisis, doctors working on the front lines are welcoming a move by Ottawa to ease the restrictions on two types of treatment options: methadone and prescription heroin.

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