St. Paul’s Hospital

Friend, can you spare a kidney? (St. Paul's Hospital)

From a friendship which developed more than 25 years ago working together in a Vancouver law firm, Jean Bell and Sue McKeeman never imagined years later they would share more than life’s milestones together—they would share the gift of a kidney.

The friends, now both Comox Valley residents, went through a truly life-saving experience when McKeeman and Bell entered the paired-exchange program through the BC Kidney Foundation.

“If you’ve got a healthy pair, why not?” said McKeeman about her participation and kidney donation to the program.

Vancouver mayor’s report maps steps to address mental health and addiction (St. Paul’s Hospital)

A task force assembled last year to address Vancouver’s “major crisis” of severe mental illness and addiction has released its recommendations on how to improve the fate of residents struggling with the health problems.

The report released Wednesday lists 23 recommendations to improve the lives of residents living with mental illness and addiction.

Vancouver mayor's task force offers no silver bullet answer to mental illness crisis (St. Paul’s Hospital)

Nearly a year after Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson created a task force to try to get to the root causes of a growing mental illness crisis in the city, the special group has issued its first report.

But if the expectation was that the 60-member committee—made up of health officials, academics, police, provincial agencies and social service groups—would have a silver bullet answer to how to stop the growth of untreated mental illness, it won't be found in its initial findings.

Vancouver mayor's first report on mental health and addiction identifies priorities for addressing a crisis (St. Paul's Hospital)

The city has published its first report on mental health and addiction nearly one year to the day that Mayor Gregor Robertson stood beside Vancouver police chief Jim Chu to ask higher levels of government for support in addressing those issues.

Robertson used the report’s publication to reiterate calls for assistance.

Services for HIV patients still needed, despite victories against AIDS (St. Paul’s Hosptial)

Bill McGuire says he would be dead today had staff at the Dr. Peter Centre not fought to get him admitted there.

McGuire, 56, has both HIV and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severe enough that he has to travel with an oxygen tank. A former drug addict with no family and few friends in Vancouver, McGuire had little ability to care for himself and manage his health conditions and ended up in hospital multiple times as a result.

iCHIP application a North American first for blood disorder patients (St. Paul’s Hospital)

Empowering patients, improving care and support, and enhancing quality of life; that’s what the newly launched iCHIP application will deliver to patients across the province of BC.

Vancouver's addiction ambitions, revisited (Dr. Thomas Kerr, Dr. Evan Wood)

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, drug policy pulsed at the heart of Vancouver's municipal politics. In 2002, Larry Campbell, the former RCMP officer turned chief coroner, carried his newly adopted COPE party into city hall by campaigning on a harm reduction platform. These ideas—clean needle distribution, supervised injection sites, and methadone—were presented as pragmatic solutions to the harms associated with drug use.

UN adopts BC doctor’s HIV strategy (Dr. Julio Montaner)

Health Headlines, Sept. 29 – Oct. 3

Sep. 29 – The United Nations has formally adopted the HIV strategy of Vancouver doctor Dr. Julio Montaner.

Click here to watch video

Dr. John Webb—a pioneer in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

St. Paul's Hospital’s Dr. John Webb stopped in Vancouver just long enough to speak at the Public Salon about the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Procedure (TAVR), which he teaches in countries around the world. TAVR is a procedure which has shown great results on patients who are high risk for open heart surgery.

Sam Sullivan writes

New heart failure drug could reduce death by 20 per cent, trial shows

A new drug for heart failure could reduce the number of deaths from the disease by 20%, and is the first treatment in two decades to show a higher survival rate for patients, says one of BC’s top cardiologists.

Dr. Andrew Ignaszewski, head of cardiology at St. Paul’s Hospital, is one of the lead researchers into the largest heart failure study to date and was in Spain on Saturday to present the findings at the European Society of Cardiology.

He called the findings a major advancement in heart failure treatment.

Tiffany Crawford reports

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