Providence In The News

Vancouver mayor's task force offers no silver bullet answer to mental illness crisis (St. Paul’s Hospital)

Nearly a year after Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson created a task force to try to get to the root causes of a growing mental illness crisis in the city, the special group has issued its first report.

But if the expectation was that the 60-member committee—made up of health officials, academics, police, provincial agencies and social service groups—would have a silver bullet answer to how to stop the growth of untreated mental illness, it won't be found in its initial findings.

Vancouver mayor's first report on mental health and addiction identifies priorities for addressing a crisis (St. Paul's Hospital)

The city has published its first report on mental health and addiction nearly one year to the day that Mayor Gregor Robertson stood beside Vancouver police chief Jim Chu to ask higher levels of government for support in addressing those issues.

Robertson used the report’s publication to reiterate calls for assistance.

Addressing youth mental health key to tackling suicide prevention

As we settle into the school year, we’re reminded of the stresses our kids can face. Many kids are able to cope with the daily demands of their lives, but for a significant number who cannot, the outcome can be extreme and tragic.

Opinion: Relieving the crunch on BC seniors

Many readers will have experienced directly, or learned through others, the anguish and frustrations of moving an elderly parent into a long-term care placement. With about 1,600 seniors already on a waiting list for the 28,000 subsidized residential care beds in British Columbia, the numbers will grow sharply as the older seniors population mushrooms in the years ahead.

Resuscitation research could save newborns

A new technique pioneered in Edmonton could change treatment of newborns around the world who need to be resuscitated.

After two years of study, University of Alberta researchers Dr. Po-Yin Cheung and Dr. Georg Schmolzer are testing their findings on how best to resuscitate newborns in a clinical trial at the Royal Alexandra Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

“With this new technique, we're learning we can do resuscitation differently and increase survival,” said Cheung, a professor in the departments of pediatrics, pharmacology and surgery.

New technology puts your own cells to work to repair and rejuvenate your body

There is enormous interest in the worlds of medicine and esthetics in the promise of regenerative medicine. From cellular replacement techniques for treating Parkinson’s disease to collagen-producing cell injections for wound healing and rejuvenating aging skin, significant steps are being made towards the commercialization of cell therapies. These changes are going to attract major industry players who are constantly on the watch for the latest technologies in development.

Patient transfer leaves senior uncertain

Ninety-four-year-old Lore Wiener hopes to live in her own home until the end of her life, but with the impending closure of primary care at three Vancouver Coastal Health clinics, her daughter says she faces an uncertain future.

Lore Wiener lives five minutes from Pacific Spirit Community Health Centre in Kerrisdale and has relied on its primary care for at least 10 years for basic needs like getting prescriptions, referrals, flu shots and general consultation.

Services for HIV patients still needed, despite victories against AIDS (St. Paul’s Hosptial)

Bill McGuire says he would be dead today had staff at the Dr. Peter Centre not fought to get him admitted there.

McGuire, 56, has both HIV and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severe enough that he has to travel with an oxygen tank. A former drug addict with no family and few friends in Vancouver, McGuire had little ability to care for himself and manage his health conditions and ended up in hospital multiple times as a result.

iCHIP application a North American first for blood disorder patients (St. Paul’s Hospital)

Empowering patients, improving care and support, and enhancing quality of life; that’s what the newly launched iCHIP application will deliver to patients across the province of BC.

Court gives BC green light on drinking-driving law

Drivers who fail or refuse roadside blood-alcohol tests will continue to face up to $4,000 in penalties following a BC Supreme Court ruling Monday. The province is within its rights to continue its roadside prohibition program, the toughest drinking-driver law in Canada, the ruling found.

Justice Malcolm D. Macaulay dismissed “all claims for constitutional relief” argued by Victoria lawyer Jeremy Carr, ruling in favour of BC’s revised roadside legislation after BC’s original law was found unconstitutional.

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