Providence In The News

A Milestone Gift

A longtime resident of Vancouver, the late Robert Kenny wanted to give back to the hospital and community that had cared for him and his partner of 54 years, Earl Crocker. His gift in will to “St. Paul's Hospital Foundation of Vancouver” of $1.25-million is the largest estate gift received to date by the Foundation.

 

Treatment as prevention captures imagination of policy makers

Vancouver has hosted the International HIV Treatment as Prevention Workshop before, but this time feels different to Dr. Julio Montaner. For the first time, foreign governments are sending high-ranking dignitaries to attend the conference to learn more about the made-in-Vancouver strategy that could pave the way for an AIDS-free generation.

BC Scientists to Take Part in National Organ Transplant Research Program

BC researchers are playing a key role in a new national organ transplant research program announced by the federal government, including developing technology designed to reduce organ rejection and the need to take immune-suppressing drugs.

Rotary Centennial creates a legacy to hearing

The Rotary Club of Vancouver chose to have a focus on hearing some 30 years ago and has supported research and aid to reduce its impact ever since.

 

Vancouver hospital emergency wait times listed online

You can check traffic at the bridges and U.S. border easily enough and plan accordingly. Now you can find out what wait times are at five hospital emergency departments in Metro Vancouver, too.

 

Pill camera provides an alternative to colonoscopy

If you’re the type who’s averse to colonoscopies, there’s new technology in town to check the colon for pre-cancerous polyps or malignant tumours. All you have to do is swallow a disposable camera that’s embedded in a jelly-bean sized pill.

St. Paul's Hospital performs unprecedented number of mechanical heart implants

St. Paul’s Hospital has implanted more than 100 Ventricular Assist Devices. The remarkable technology has offered life to patients who otherwise would have died. 

British Columbia launches plan to fight against viral hepatitis based on HIV model

The plan to wipe out HIV infection by British Columbia health experts was so successful, they're trying to replicate the idea for the treatment of viral hepatitis. Concern about viral hepatitis is primarily in immigrant populations, according to Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, who announced $1.9 million in new provincial funding this week. She said it's common for people who come to Canada from other countries with less preventive vaccines to have viral hepatitis without knowing it - even those in their “prime.” 

BC invests millions in hospices, creates action plan for end-of-life care

BC's minister of health today committed millions of dollars to four hospices in the Lower Mainland, and announced an action plan for the future of end-of-life care in the province. “[When someone is dying] it can be a time where there is grief and sorrow, but it can also be a time of joy and celebration of that person's life, so I think for me, the important thing about the announcements we're making is it's not about dying, it's about living,” said Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid today at a press conference inside the Vancouver Hospice Society hospice home in Shaughnessy, a new hospice that will now open its beds to patients due to the funding boost.

Heart disease often hits women hardest

More women are dying of heart attacks than men, but cardiologists still don’t understand why female patients have worse outcomes. 

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