Providence In The News

BC Scientists to Take Part in National Organ Transplant Research Program

BC researchers are playing a key role in a new national organ transplant research program announced by the federal government, including developing technology designed to reduce organ rejection and the need to take immune-suppressing drugs.

Rotary Centennial creates a legacy to hearing

The Rotary Club of Vancouver chose to have a focus on hearing some 30 years ago and has supported research and aid to reduce its impact ever since.

 

Vancouver hospital emergency wait times listed online

You can check traffic at the bridges and U.S. border easily enough and plan accordingly. Now you can find out what wait times are at five hospital emergency departments in Metro Vancouver, too.

 

Pill camera provides an alternative to colonoscopy

If you’re the type who’s averse to colonoscopies, there’s new technology in town to check the colon for pre-cancerous polyps or malignant tumours. All you have to do is swallow a disposable camera that’s embedded in a jelly-bean sized pill.

St. Paul's Hospital performs unprecedented number of mechanical heart implants

St. Paul’s Hospital has implanted more than 100 Ventricular Assist Devices. The remarkable technology has offered life to patients who otherwise would have died. 

British Columbia launches plan to fight against viral hepatitis based on HIV model

The plan to wipe out HIV infection by British Columbia health experts was so successful, they're trying to replicate the idea for the treatment of viral hepatitis. Concern about viral hepatitis is primarily in immigrant populations, according to Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid, who announced $1.9 million in new provincial funding this week. She said it's common for people who come to Canada from other countries with less preventive vaccines to have viral hepatitis without knowing it - even those in their “prime.” 

BC invests millions in hospices, creates action plan for end-of-life care

BC's minister of health today committed millions of dollars to four hospices in the Lower Mainland, and announced an action plan for the future of end-of-life care in the province. “[When someone is dying] it can be a time where there is grief and sorrow, but it can also be a time of joy and celebration of that person's life, so I think for me, the important thing about the announcements we're making is it's not about dying, it's about living,” said Health Minister Margaret MacDiarmid today at a press conference inside the Vancouver Hospice Society hospice home in Shaughnessy, a new hospice that will now open its beds to patients due to the funding boost.

Heart disease often hits women hardest

More women are dying of heart attacks than men, but cardiologists still don’t understand why female patients have worse outcomes. 

Clean hands help BC hospitals cut infection rates

WALK INTO JUST about any health facility in the province and you’ll notice hand-sanitizer stations in every direction you look. They’re mounted on walls at entrances, in waiting rooms, outside elevators, and at patients’ bedsides. The antibacterial dispensers are a big part of preventing and controlling the spread of infections in hospitals and clinics.
“About 70 to 80 percent of hospital infections can be attributed to direct contact with patients,” said Dr. Marc Romney, Providence Health Care’s medical director for infection prevention and control. “So if we can ensure that those hands are clean…then we are much more likely to decrease rates of hospital-acquired infections.” Romney, a medical microbiologist at St. Paul’s Hospital, told the Straight by phone that the emergence of a new family of antibiotic-resistant bacteria called carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is proving a challenge for infection-control efforts.

BC hospitals on watch for new CRE superbugs

Hospitals in B.C. are on the lookout for a new class of antibiotic-resistant superbugs that have hit more than 200 hospitals in the U.S. in only six months. The Centre for Disease Control in the U.S. has warned Canadian health authorities about the increase of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a deadly class of superbugs that are resistant to all known antibiotics. Dr. Marc Romney, a medical microbiologist at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, said B.C. health authorities are aware of CRE and are taking preventative measures.

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