Shelley Fraser — Professional Practice & Nursing

Caption: Shelley Fraser has always found herself gravitating back to Providence.

By Jodi Gillich

Providence Health Care’s mission, vision and values have always been a good fit for Shelley Fraser.

In 1989, Shelley started at St. Paul’s as a student nurse. In the years that followed, she moved around a lot, took time off to have twin boys — now 15 — and get her Master’s Degree in Nursing. But she always found herself gravitating back to Providence.

Her current role focuses on education strategy. This has allowed her to focus on her passion for teaching and creating strong cultures of learning.

“I think there is a strong link between a culture of learning and excellence in patient care,” says Shelley, Professional Practice and adjunct professor with the UBC School of Nursing.

Recently, Shelley was asked to join the Clinical & Systems Transformation project’s Transformational Learning Advisory Group. The CST project will result in a “new normal’ for point of care staff by moving from a largely paper-based to a primarily electronic patient health care record.

“It’s been a great experience meeting and working with colleagues across PHSA, VCH and PHC,” she says.

Shelley is determined to ensure Providence staff are prepared for the change. From people who need the basics to those who have worked with electronic systems before, she is part of a team contributing to an education program that supports everyone.

“Having an excellent process of preparing people can make the biggest difference,” she says.

Shelley is excited about what CST will deliver — starting from the moment a patient walks through the door. With the new clinical information system, staff will have improved access to patient data in real time, with less time spent chasing charts or results. Patients won’t have to repeat their information over and over.

It also means safer care. With things like closed loop medication management, a fully electronic process for ordering, verifying, preparing and administering medication, Shelley says the risk of medication errors should go down substantially.

“It will completely transform the way we deliver care. It’s exciting to be part of the team supporting the change.”