Stories

Talena Hale - Clinical Nurse Leader, Acute Behavioral Stabilization Unit (ABSU)

Talena (left) and Rubina Khan of the ABSU

“Patients rarely exist in isolation. He or she is part of a system which includes family and friends. Taking a moment to say to a family member, 'your loved one is safe now, you can go and rest,' can relieve a lot of tension from that system.”

Cindy Taylor - Rehab Assistant, St. Vincent’s: Brock Fahrni

“While I got my start at George Derby Centre, I’ve worked with elders at Providence Health Care for 29 years. I didn’t know there was such a job as a rehab assistant.  I just fell into the job, and after 33 years I still love it.”

Victoria Morris — Mount Saint Joseph Hospital

Victoria Morris moved to Vancouver on a whim and hasn’t looked back.

Originally from Ontario, the registered nurse soon found a job with Providence Health Care. Five years later, she accepted the role of clinical nurse educator for the Medicine and Ambulatory Clinics at Mount Saint Joseph Hospital.

“I love that I can keep people excited about some of the new stuff that’s going on, and I also get to sit with people when they’re a little more vulnerable and asking for help,” she says.

Brian Smith, MPA − Photographer

Providence Health Care (PHC) has a secret that not many people know about. For over
thirty-two years, the basement of St. Paul’s Hospital has been the workplace of one of Canada’s longest-serving and most talented in-hospital photographers.

Meet Brian Smith − photographer, world traveler and humanitarian.

Wayne Fritz - Nurse Educator, ICU

“I’m into the unit around 7 a.m. and begin by checking in with the night duty staff. After catching up on some emails I’m ready to go for 7:30. I have a strict open door policy, people stop in and ask questions and I’m here Monday to Friday.”

Cheryl Gavin - Holy Family Hospital “A Second Home” To Retiring Nurse

“At first I began as a casual worker because my husband at the time worked at a nearby school,” says Cheryl, Registered Nurse. “But I stayed because it became a second home for me. It’s got an amazing support system. The sense of family you get is so comforting.”

Sarah Carriere - Change Specialist and Peer Nurse Immunizer

“I love educating people about medicine and health, so for me it was a no-brainer. The issue of the flu shot, and vaccinations in general, is a really hot topic so I’m looking forward to being able to give people access to good information.”

Brenda McKnight, Physiotherapy Site Leader, Holy Family Hospital

Whether it’s simply being able to go home with supports or walking independently again, many patients in Holy Family Hospital’s Rehabilitation Centre face tough roads ahead. Physiotherapist Brenda McKnight has watched countless people achieve their goals.

“We have success with a lot of our patients; a lot of them do improve and overcome tremendous hurdles. If somebody is motived and has family support, they often do really well despite their physical limitations,” says Brenda, who’s worked with Providence Health Care for over 15 years.

Sarah Irving - Peer Support Worker, Inner City Youth Program

“I have had my own experience with mental health and I know how tough it can be. After I became well, I was incredibly inspired to give back to the field and people that gave so much to me.”

Eric Starr — RN, Intensive Care Unit

 

From a hush that’s conducive to recovery to a sense of urgency when patients need it most, Eric Starr says the Intensive Care Unit at St. Paul’s Hospital is never the same from day to day.

“Some days you’re run off your feet, and other days are a little more quiet,” says Eric, a registered nurse who has worked at St. Paul’s for over nine years. He chose St. Paul’s for its staff, patients and culture of caring; he says staff take the time to interact with patients.

Rubina Mahal, Recruitment Advisor, Human Resources

“I recently spoke with a new grad nurse who had life before nursing. She worked for a number of community organizations and had a wealth of community-based experience. When I asked her why she thought she was still unemployed, she commented many health authorities saw her previous experience intimidating or that she was over qualified for new grad positions. In speaking with her, I was intrigued by her previous experience and thought it would be silly to pass her up. I sent her resume to a few operations leaders who also saw the potential. PHC benefited greatly. I can’t wait to see what she does.”

CAROL PALEY – ART INSTRUCTOR, ARTWORKS

Carol with her co-instructor

 “When you have trouble articulating your feelings, you can still use a crayon to express yourself. A lot of the people here have dementia or have had a stroke and are dealing with a lot of frustrations and sadness. Instead of staying stuck in a place of, ‘I can’t do this, I can’t do that,’ Artworks helps us to show these guys, ‘but you can do art and you can be really good at it.’”

Cindy Lawlor - Operations Leader, Heart Centre

“The recognition and support of my mentors, supervisors, and managers here at St. Paul's nurtured my growth as a leader which has helped take me to where I am today.”

Neil Fowler, Program Assistant: HIV/AIDS & Aboriginal Health

“Coming into health care after 20 years in another industry was a bit intimidating at first. I was a bit worried about not being accepted into a clinical environment, and that my skills would be under-utilized. I very quickly realized, however, that people really are all the same everywhere, and as long as you work hard, others will appreciate you, and value your contributions to the team.”

Laurie Fraser - Clinical Nurse Leader, Emergency Department

“Working here means I get to see everything – babies being born, families dealing with the loss of loved ones and everything in between. I’m honoured and privileged to be allowed in people’s lives.”

Alice Chan – Clinical Nurse Specialist, Mental Health

This week’s meet & greet coincides with World Suicide Prevention Day, so Alice was a natural choice, but we also wanted to include a patient’s perspective on the topic. Jude was treated at St Paul’s after his suicide attempt and now works in the community as a Peer Support Worker with Vancouver Coastal Health.

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